Recognized in the Washington Business Journal’s 2018 40 Under 40 list for his exemplary achievements in the legal field.Washington Business Journal 2018

Roman Martinez

Washington, D.C.
  • 555 Eleventh Street, NW
  • Suite 1000
  • Washington, D.C. 20004-1304
  • USA
 
 

Roman Martinez is a partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Latham & Watkins. As a member of the firm’s Supreme Court & Appellate Practice, he focuses primarily on appeals in the Supreme Court of the United States, the United States Courts of Appeals, and state appellate courts. Mr. Martinez has handled civil and criminal matters involving a wide range of constitutional, statutory, and administrative law issues, and he has argued cases in the Supreme Court and the D.C., Second, Sixth, Ninth, and Federal Circuits, among other courts.

Mr. Martinez’s appellate practice encompasses civil and criminal matters spanning virtually all areas of law. He recently rejoined Latham after serving as an Assistant to the Solicitor General at the US Department of Justice. In that role, he represented the United States in litigation before the Supreme Court and advised the Solicitor General on the government’s appellate litigation throughout the country.

Mr. Martinez has personally argued eight cases in the Supreme Court, including important cases in the fields of patent law, criminal law, civil rights, and civil procedure. He has filed more than 75 briefs in the Supreme Court involving a wide range of issues spanning administrative, tax, securities, intellectual property, criminal, environmental, education, civil rights, and First Amendment law.

Over the past year, Mr. Martinez has led Latham appellate teams in cases involving the First Amendment, Administrative Procedure Act, securities, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), products liability, tort, and employment law. He persuaded the Supreme Court to grant certiorari in three cases over the past two Terms, including a First Amendment challenge to the constitutionality of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which he will argue in April 2020. Last year, he persuaded the Supreme Court to reject the State of Connecticut’s effort to reinstate the murder conviction of Michael Skakel.

Mr. Martinez’s extensive pro bono practice focuses chiefly on administrative law challenges to unlawful agency action by the Department of Veterans Affairs, as well as on criminal defense appeals. In 2018, he persuaded the Supreme Court to grant certiorari on behalf of a veteran seeking judicial review of an unlawful regulation promulgated by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Before joining Latham, Mr. Martinez served as a law clerk to Chief Justice John G. Roberts of the Supreme Court of the United States and to then-Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of the D.C. Circuit.

From 2002 to 2005, Mr. Martinez served as an advisor on the Iraqi political and constitutional process, in various roles at the White House, at the US Embassy and Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq, and at the US Department of Defense. He received the Secretary of Defense Medal for the Global War on Terrorism and the US Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Award for his service in Iraq.

Mr. Martinez serves on the US Chamber of Commerce's Administrative Law & Government Litigation Advisory Committee, and he is a member of the Edward Coke Appellate Inn of Court. He previously served as a member of the D.C. Circuit’s Advisory Committee on Procedures, and now serves on the US District Court for the District of Columbia’s Committee on Grievances. His commentary has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and other publications, and he has appeared on the PBS NewsHour and other television programs to discuss the Supreme Court.

 
 
 
Notice: We appreciate your interest in Latham & Watkins. If your inquiry relates to a legal matter and you are not already a current client of the firm, please do not transmit any confidential information to us. Before taking on a representation, we must determine whether we are in a position to assist you and agree on the terms and conditions of engagement with you. Until we have completed such steps, we will not be deemed to have a lawyer-client relationship with you, and will have no duty to keep confidential the information we receive from you. Thank you for your understanding.