Christopher D. Frey

New York
  • 1271 Avenue of the Americas
  • New York, NY 10020
  • USA
 
 

Christopher D. Frey, a former federal prosecutor and partner in the New York office, advises clients on white collar and regulatory defense, government and internal investigations, and related high-stakes litigation.

Mr. Frey regularly advises major Japanese and other global companies and leading financial institutions in their most sensitive matters, and has amassed significant experience in the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), anti-money laundering, and economic sanctions areas. Mr. Frey also routinely provides strategic counseling on compliance issues and crisis management.

Mr. Frey previously served as an Assistant US Attorney in the Criminal Division of the US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York. There, he was a member of the Securities & Commodities Fraud Task Force and the Complex Frauds and Cybercrime Unit. Mr. Frey investigated and prosecuted a wide array of complex white-collar matters, including FCPA violations, insider trading, accounting fraud, market manipulation, investment advisor fraud, money laundering, intellectual property and cybercrimes, and criminal tax offenses. During his tenure as a prosecutor, Mr. Frey was the lead trial lawyer in numerous jury trials, and he has substantial appellate experience, having briefed and/or argued over a dozen appeals before the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Mr. Frey is a recipient of the US Department of Justice’s John Marshall Award for Outstanding Legal Achievement.

From 2014 to 2015, Mr. Frey served as Associate Counsel in the Office of the White House Counsel under President Barack Obama. In that capacity, Mr. Frey helped develop and execute the White House’s response to various Congressional investigations, and provided legal and strategic advice to White House staff and Executive Branch officials on compliance, oversight, and risk management issues.

Mr. Frey has previously served on both the New York City Bar Association’s Criminal Advocacy Committee and its Judiciary Committee, which reviews and evaluates all judicial candidates for the federal and state courts in New York City. During law school, Mr. Frey served as the notes editor of the Stanford Law Review.

Mr. Frey’s experience includes advising:

  • A significant Japanese financial institution in parallel federal and state regulatory proceedings in the United States*
  • A Japanese company in connection with an investigation conducted by a multilateral development bank of potential corruption issues*
  • Various Japanese companies in internal and government-initiated bribery/corruption related investigations*
  • A major Japanese conglomerate and its US subsidiary in a fraud investigation conducted by the US Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California*
  • Several Japanese manufacturing companies in connection with product quality assurance issues, including data falsification and manipulation*
  • A Taiwanese manufacturing company in a sanctions, money laundering, and bank fraud investigation by the US Department of Justice*
  • A Korean semiconductor company in a US Securities and Exchange Commission investigation regarding various accounting issues*
  • Several Japanese and Chinese financial institutions in Bank Secrecy Act/anti-money laundering matters, including advising on remedial measures and compliance program enhancements*
  • Numerous private equity funds, investment banks, sovereign wealth funds, pension plans, and other institutional investors in connection with compliance-related transactional due diligence in Asia*

*Matter handled prior to joining Latham

 
 
 
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