Judge Jonathan Lippman Honored for Public Service

June 04, 2019

Judge Jonathan Lippman, of counsel in Latham’s New York office, was recently recognized with two high-profile awards in honor of his long career of public service.
 
The judge was named to the inaugural Law Power 50 list, which showcases “the 50 most powerful people in New York politics working in law,” according to “achievements, track record and their sway with powerful politicians.” City and State recognized the judge’s contributions while serving as both chief judge of New York and chief judge of the state Court of Appeals. He was also lauded for his work with the Rikers Commission, charged with reforming the city’s criminal justice system. Learn more about the commission’s work by watching a short video
 
In addition, Judge Lippman received the Bishop Joseph Sullivan Award for Public Service from the Fund for the City of New York at its 2019 Sloan Public Service Awards Celebration. In selecting Judge Lippman for this award, the Fund noted the judge’s long career in public service: “Like Bishop Sullivan, Judge Lippman [has] married his understanding of public service to his appreciation for the people who live in New York City, especially its families and children; his appreciation for its neighborhoods; his appreciation for the institutions that help to create vital communities, and his appreciation for the role of government to be a force for equality and opportunity.” 
 
Judge Lippman joined Latham as of counsel in the firm’s Litigation & Trial Department in 2015, after retiring as Chief Judge of the State of New York and Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals. On the bench, he championed equal access to justice and helped make New York State the first US state to require pro bono work for admission to the bar.

 
 
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